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Following successful trials, the Chaucer BMI hospital in Canterbury, Kent has recently adopted a new safety syringe to reduce the risk of needlestick injuries. This puts them ahead of many other hospitals in complying with the latest EU directives 7318/10 & 8491/10 aimed at achieving the safest possible working environment for healthcare workers

Following successful trials, the Chaucer BMI hospital in Canterbury, Kent has recently adopted a new safety syringe to reduce the risk of needlestick injuries. This puts them ahead of many other hospitals in complying with the latest EU directives 7318/10 & 8491/10 aimed at achieving the safest possible working environment for healthcare workers.

The syringe known as Safe Inject features a retractable protective sheath that safely covers the needle when not is use. It also benefits from being single use thus reducing the risk of cross infection. After use it is simply disposed of in a sharps bin eliminating any sterilising costs which can today be in excess of £3 per item.

Having recognised that the healthcare industry is favouring single use products more and more, a disposable metal dental syringe was previously used in the Chaucer for dermatology, minor ops, eye surgery, colposcopy and dental work. Switching to Safe Inject for these procedures will reduce costs by as much as 80% in this case.

Since the introduction, all staff have undergone professional training giving the most up to date advice and best practice on needlestick injury prevention, ensuring correct use and leading to successful integration into the hospital. Being similar in some aspects to the previous dental syringes and using the same dental anaesthetic cartridges meant the change over was straight forward.

The initial trials carried out led to a number of findings.

•    Improved safety. Needlestick injuries have been reduced to 0 since implementing.
•    The transparent barrel made aspiration clearly visible and the self aspiration worked well
•    Less intimidating to younger patients than the metal syringes.
•    The plastic made it easier to grip than metal syringes especially with wet gloves.
•    The bevel indicator made it easy to ensure correct insertion.
•    More Convenient. There was no need to attach the needle before use as it is integrated. No need to remove the needle after use eliminating a high risk stage where needlestick injuries can easily occur.
•    All needle lengths and gauges tested were the same in terms of flexibility and control as the previous needles.
•    Improved infection control. Every device is sterile wrapped and then disposed of after use so no chance of cross infection.
•    Licensed for use in all medical areas, not just dental.

Sonja Hardy, the clinical lead that instigated the change, says “Changing to a different device in any department can be a difficult process as consultants become comfortable working with certain tools and can very often refuse to change. The fact that Safe Inject was such a benefit in terms of safety, and reduced costs made justifying the decision very easy.”

The successful results of the trial and adoption of this product means that the Chaucer are already complying with the EU directive set to be in place by May 2013. With increased pressures to reduce costs and over 250 other NHS hospitals and the majority of training universities in the UK using Safe Inject, this is a product worth some research and consideration.

Further information can be found at www.kentpharm.co.uk/safeinject

Written by Scott Buckler
Thursday, 16 February 2012 11:11

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