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TOPIC: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs

Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 1 month, 2 weeks ago #1

We’d like to hear your thoughts on how emerging health and wellbeing boards are faring and what we should all be setting our sights on.

Much of the early research has looked at who is on them, how often they’ve met and what ‘stage’ they are at. Whilst this is useful, we think it risks missing the picture around personalities, vision and leadership – the number one attribute everyone seems to agree boards will need in abundance in such a difficult climate.

Admittedly, all boards will need time to find their feet. However, with a good year under our belts since the Government’s response to the Future Forum report raised the stakes for local boards, we think clear water is emerging between those that have grasped the nettle of leadership and those that haven’t.

So, to get the discussion going, here’s three key questions that we think tell you a lot about any board, we'd like to know what you think.

• Leadership: Has your board got strong personalities who realise things need to change, or are they tempted sit back and hold the fort?
• Vision: Is your board all about making a difference to the community, or do vested interests prevail?
• Intelligence: Does your board recognise how crucial the JSNA and JHWS processes will be, or are they just another tick box?

Looking forward to hearing from everyone.

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 1 month ago #2

Leadership: Has your board got strong personalities who realise things need to change, or are they tempted sit back and hold the fort?

• Vision: Is your board all about making a difference to the community, or do vested interests prevail?
• Intelligence: Does your board recognise how crucial the JSNA and JHWS processes will be, or are they just another tick box?

Health Boards – back in Feb 2012, there was an estimated 138 health boards across the boroughs. The concerning questioning is will these boards actually deliver what they set out to? Boards are quick to develop strategy and steering boards but in terms of delivery – that often has set backs… changes after changes, delays after delay, overspends after overspends… is something these boards will plan to avoid or is this going to be another change strategy for the sake of chaos with no change to show at the end?

Leadership: Some organizations (and boards) have great leaders. The good leaderships is not only about having strong personalities – but also having a humble personality where they not only exert their authority on others but also play key role in delivery by being proactive and ensuring their organization deliver the objectives set out. It means setting in place a dedicated team who are passionate about achieving objectives and making a difference in the community!

Vision: Involving the wider and the hard to reach communities – those seen and those not seen. In the state of the current economic environment, unemployment will rise, the dole queues will get longer and it is more likely thank not that health of individuals will deteriorate as depression / mental health issues increase with people unable to find jobs to sustain their families. Boards need to address – what can they do to help improve the health of their communities, how far are they willing to go? And most importantly, how do they propose to do that – are they really equipped for it?

Intelligence – JSNA/JHWS. Are joint assessments and joint strategies really joint – and to what extent are they likely to be joint? How are they planning on making this inclusive for all? What are the target areas and who are the targets? How do the propose to target those targets?

Each areas, each borough have their statistics and own agenda. Having previously tried to join forces for the Children’s Services and Health Service for a few boroughs to improve efficiencies and save costs for all, it was a matter of banging heads against a brick wall and achieving nothing but blood stains on the wall! Area A will not expand their services to Area B, because the funding assigned to Area A only – even if it means leaving empty places and wasting funds unnecessarily – funds which is paid by tax payers! If joint working and collaboration is on the agenda – leaders need to be smart about the way they work. Have clarity and transparency about the objectives and processes and avoid wastage of people’s time, effort and funds.
Last Edit: 1 month ago by Matthew Abbott.

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 1 month ago #3

Boards will need to demonstrate leadership, intelligence and vision which go beyond traditional boundaries. The green paper ‘Support and Aspiration’ proposes reforms in which health, care and education plan and commission together to meet all the needs of children and young people with complex disabilities or learning difficulties. It will be vital that the boards don’t use their legs to run away from these responsibilities.

We all know this joining up makes sense, but we also know that it is one of the hardest things to achieve in practice. Furthermore, the requirement to work together comes at a time when the agencies concerned are undergoing their own internal changes and understandably investing time and energy in getting those right. The only way to make the reforms work in the best interests of children and young people is to plan for them from the start, not as an afterthought.

So if you are a board with legs, make sure they take you on a walk that includes the social care and education sectors too!

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 4 weeks, 1 day ago #4

From my experience in the past on boards with similar briefs to the current HWB's role, looking to the horizon and scanning the requirements for HWB in the new architecture for Health and Social Care I think that, leadership, governance, communication and understanding the demographics of the community served and co production, combined with clear measurable indicators of efficacy are key to translating vision, mission and strategic planning into sustainable, equitable, health ecology are essential.
Last Edit: 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Scott Buckler.

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 4 weeks ago #5

Our local Shadow Leadership Board has only met once, and was partly a "getting to know one another" exercise.

I would say that the individuals are enthusiastic and responsible, looking for ways to contribute to improved health and well-being beyond the provision of services in silos. The councillor chairing was excellent.

There is a clear local focus and priorities have been established with Public Health. The representative of the major health provider emphasised a community approach.

The JSNA and JHWS processes were only briefly mentioned, but enough to indicate their real importance.

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 3 weeks, 2 days ago #6

Our Shadow Health and Wellbeing Board has set a clear vision to improve outcomes for people in Central Bedfordshire and to focus on key areas where partnership working can achieve the most gains. We have taken advantage of support for development for the Board through the LGA Health and Wellbeing Board Development programme. There is great enthusiasm for joint working and a keenness to address cross cutting issues using the life course approach. The Board is chaired by the Executive Member for Economic Partnerships – this takes account of the need to address the wider determinants of health.
We have produced a refresh of the JSNA and are currently consulting on our Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy which is being lead by Public Health. The Health and Wellbeing Board for us in Central Bedfordshire is certainly much more than a tick box exercise.

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 2 weeks, 2 days ago #7

Some, but not all, LINks have struggled hard to become representative of the communities in which they operate. Going forward, how can local HealthWatch organisations ensure that they are representative of all local communities and groups, and give voice to their concerns. In particularly, how can local HealthWatch organisations support local NHS and social care organisations to meet the public sector Equality Duty, ensuring optimum patient, service user and public engagement across all communities.

Health and Wellbeing Boards will be in a good position to support local NHS and social care organisations to meet the public sector Equality Duty. But how can they pro-actively ensure that they are constituted and run in such a way that the concerns of patients, service users and groups from all communities are given a full and effective voice. What opportunities will local HealthWatch organisations take or be given, with their single seat on Boards, to deliver this voice.

If we are not serious about equality, other important matters will be prioritised ahead of fairness, and we shall commence the new era with equality in the back seat – on the back burner – as it ever was; and a great opportunity will be missed and nothing will change. What can we do to make a real and lasting difference this time?

Re: Bang the table? How to spot a health and wellbeing board with legs 2 weeks ago #8

My experience of Health and Wellbeing Boards has been very positive to date. We have a strong chairman who is enthusiastic and upbeat about the changes to health and the new responsibilities that local authorities are acquiring. The relationship between board members is well-developed and there is a sense that everyone is working towards the same goal.

Whilst there have been positive examples of joint working between various partner organisations in developing the JSNA and HWBS, the test is now whether the HWB has the leadership skills to engage with partners responsible for the delivery of these priorities, and whether partners acknowledge their responsibilities and can work effectively together to deliver on joint local outcomes.

So far, so good but there are still some important issues to work through such as how the HWB is scrutinised and where it will sit in relation to existing decision making bodies within the Council, as well as how effectively the HWBS and JSNA priorities are delivered
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