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TOPIC: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass

Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #1

At the sustainable transport conference on 31st October, British Gas, Hitachi Capital and Transport for London are presenting a masterclass on implementing electric vehicle infrastructure.

British Gas are a leading energy provider and installer of charging solutions for homes and businesses. We have been appointed by many vehicle manufacturers releasing electric vehicles to help their customers, who have included a number of public sector institutions. We will be leading the discussion by providing advice and expertise, and will be supported by Hitachi Capital and TfL in providing practical advice and expertise to participants of the masterclass.

In advance of this session, we wanted to ask you to provide us with any questions or thoughts that you might have on your mind which you would like to see answered by the group during the masterclass.Please reply to this post with any that you have and we will do our best to answer them.

Also, we would welcome any case studies or examples of organistions who have decided to start their journey to install infrastructure, the experiences they have had, and any top tips for others looking to do the same. Let us know if you would be happy to be named as well, so that others can learn from your experience.

I look forward to seeing you all at 2.15pm on the 31st.

Katie Alloway
Commercial manager - Electric vehicles
British Gas
07789 575915
Last Edit: by Katie Alloway.

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #2

Are all car manufacturers designing a "common" fully interchangeable design of electric motor battery that can be replaced at wind/solar powered charging and replacement stations quickly (similar to petrol stations but stopping to swap out the battery for a recharged one) Drivers should be able to change (one in one out and drive on? Even if these exchange points are every 50 miles or so and need to be manned intially, at least all drivers could use the same casset type design (similar to the battery that starts the old petrol engined versions) Eventually these battery swap stations could be self serve using technology to ensure the replacement went smothly. Just a thought?

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #3

Hi Katie, we are near the beginning of building the infrastructure for an electric vehicle car club, concentrating on cities and islands. I'd be happy to have a chat with you and explain what we're planning.

regards,
Phil Edwards, SusMobil
07737 665061

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #4

Hi Had a quick look at the website. So you still have to stop and plug in the Car/Van Lorry? What about rural areas, can a wind/solar powered charging/exchange point be considered? How would this get it's power if wind and solar are not viable? Would it not be better working with all vehicle manufacturers to design a standard changeable battery for all vehicle types? If properly designed (Compact modular unit) it could fit any vehicle and be exchanged at wind-powered exchange points on a one in one out basis. This is a direct infrastucture replacement for petol stations and could include rural and remote towns and villages? ( Lets not repete the braodband roll-out fiasco? Surely this is better than relying on fossil fuel based power to plug in to for the next 3 or four decades? Where is the vision?
Last Edit: by Frank Inglis.

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #5

Frank Inglis wrote:
Hi Had a quick look at the website. So you still have to stop and plug in the Car/Van Lorry? What about rural areas, can a wind/solar powered charging/exchange point be considered? How would this get it's power if wind and solar are not viable? Would it not be better working with all vehicle manufacturers to design a standard changeable battery for all vehicle types? If properly designed (Compact modular unit) it could fit any vehicle and be exchanged at wind-powered exchange points on a one in one out basis. This is a direct infrastucture replacement for petol stations and could include rural and remote towns and villages? ( Lets not repete the braodband roll-out fiasco? Surely this is better than relying on fossil fuel based power to plug in to for the next 3 or four decades? Where is the vision?


No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it. Albert Einstein

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #6

Yes you need to plug in. Stop and plug in? well, plug in a the end of the journey if that's what you mean by 'stop'. Fossil fuels? no mention of them so not sure whaere that came from. Any charging could certainly be wind/solar powered. Wind/solar with battery storage is already available to constantly power street and traffic lights whether it's windy or not, daylight or not.

If plugging in is a problem the inductive charging trials are taking place. That's perfectly feasible to do today, but at the moment the on-vehicle part is very expensive. The 'street' furniture costs about the same as a good chargepoint but the vehicle manufacturer can't swallow the onboard cost of the equipment. With an OEM involved I don't suppose the costs will stay high for too long.

Better Place have been trying to get battery swap under way for years now, and have invested millions in it. Getting manufacturers to adopt a standard might be the biggest hurdle in the immediate future.

Then you've got fast charging (genuinely fast - 10-15mins from flat even on a very large battery pack). That's possible today, it just needs a Lithium Titanate battery, but there are a couple of cars out there with it. A bit more development and you might get close to petrol refuelling times. The designers like it because they are left with free-rein to put the battery where the styling dictates, not where the battery swap dictates.

Or Hydrogen. That's being demonstrated and a small generation plant (easily dropped into place anywhere) will produce enough in a day to fuel 4 large vehicles with about 350 mile range each. With small vehicles/short journeys a lot of vehicles could be served by one small palnt

There are lots of ideas, all being tested in different places.

Re: Installing Electric Vehicle Infrastructure - Questions and case studies for conference masterclass #7

Thank you all for your comments on this forum. Frank - I will take your question away as I will need to speak with our partners to get their take on your thoughts.

See you all tomorrow,

Katie
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